This site is intended for US healthcare professionals.

Efficacy of BARHEMSYS, a Broadly Studied Proven Antiemetic Treatment

BARHEMSYS was studied in 4 pivotal trials encompassing ~2000 patients.1

BARHEMSYS as a Rescue Treatment for PONV

Studied in Patients Who Failed Prophylaxis

BARHEMSYS 10 mg was evaluated for the rescue treatment of PONV in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial comprising adult patients who had undergone elective ambulatory or inpatient surgery under general anesthesia and failed prior antiemetic prophylaxis with 1 or more agents of a different class (N=465).1,2,*

Patient Baseline Characteristics at Randomization

BARHEMSYS: Proven Effective for Your Patients Suffering From PONV After Failed Prophylaxis

At 24 hours

29%

Placebo

(n=235)

42%

BARHEMSYS 10 mg

(n=230)

10 mg

In patients who failed prophylaxis

42% (96/230) of BARHEMSYS 10 mg-treated patients met the criteria for complete response at 24 hours compared with 29% (67/235) of placebo-treated patients1,2,*

Difference (95% CI): 13% (5%, 22%); P=0.003

The primary efficacy endpoint was complete response, defined as absence of any episode of emesis (vomiting or retching) or use of rescue medication within the first 24 hours after treatment, excluding emesis in the first 30 minutes.1,2

Kaplan-Meier Curves: Complete Response Over Time2

Try adjusting the slider to take a closer look at the time points.
Hours
6
24
24


Complete Response Rates at Prespecified Times

2 Hours
4 Hours
6 Hours

Secondary endpoint

In patients who failed prophylaxis

70% (160/230) of patients met the criteria for complete response at 2 hours after receiving a 10 mg dose of BARHEMSYS compared with 49% (116/235) of placebo-treated patients2,*

*The secondary endpoint was not adequately powered nor error controlled, and observed treatment differences cannot be regarded as statistically significant.

BARHEMSYS Is Part of a Proven Combination Prophylaxis Therapy

Studied in High-Risk Patients

BARHEMSYS 5 mg was evaluated in combination with an antiemetic of a different class for the prevention of PONV in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial comprising adult patients at high risk of developing PONV undergoing general anesthesia during elective inpatient surgery (N=1147).1,3,†

Patient Baseline Characteristics at Randomization

BARHEMSYS Demonstrated Efficacy as Part of a Combination Prophylaxis for the Prevention of PONV in High-Risk Patients

At 24 hours

47%

Placebo

+ Another Antiemetic (n=575)

58%

BARHEMSYS 5 mg

+ Another Antiemetic (n=572)

5 mg

In patients who received combination prophylaxis

58% (330/572) of BARHEMSYS 5 mg-treated patients met the criteria for complete response at 24 hours compared with 47% (268/575) of placebo-treated patients1,3,‡

Difference (95% CI): 11% (5%, 17%); P<0.001

BARHEMSYS as a PONV therapy choice supports the guideline recommendation that adults who are at a high risk for PONV should receive combination prophylactic therapy.1,3,4

The primary efficacy endpoint was complete response, defined as absence of any episode of emesis (vomiting or retching) or use of rescue medication within the first 24 hours following surgery.1,3

Indications

BARHEMSYS is a selective dopamine-2 (D2) and dopamine-3 (D3) receptor antagonist indicated in adults for:

  • prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), either alone or in combination with an antiemetic of a different class
  • treatment of PONV in patients who have received antiemetic prophylaxis with an agent of a different class or have not received prophylaxis

Important Safety Information

Contraindication

BARHEMSYS is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to amisulpride.

QT Prolongation

BARHEMSYS causes dose- and concentration-dependent prolongation of the QT interval. The recommended dosage is 5 mg or 10 mg as a single intravenous (IV) dose infused over 1 to 2 minutes.

Avoid BARHEMSYS in patients with congenital long QT syndrome and in patients taking droperidol.

Electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring is recommended in patients with pre-existing arrhythmias/cardiac conduction disorders, electrolyte abnormalities (e.g., hypokalemia or hypomagnesemia), congestive heart failure, and in patients taking other medicinal products (e.g., ondansetron) or with other medical conditions known to prolong the QT interval.

Adverse Reactions

Common adverse reactions reported in ≥ 2% of adult patients who received BARHEMSYS 5 mg (N=748) and at a higher rate than placebo (N=741) in clinical trials for the prevention of PONV were: chills (4% vs. 3%), hypokalemia (4% vs. 2%), procedural hypotension (3% vs. 2%), and abdominal distention (2% vs. 1%).

Serum prolactin concentrations were measured in one prophylaxis study where 5% (9/176) of BARHEMSYS-treated patients had increased blood prolactin reported as an adverse reaction compared with 1% (1/166) of placebo-treated patients.

The most common adverse reaction, reported in ≥ 2% of adult patients who received BARHEMSYS 10 mg (N=418) and at a higher rate than placebo (N=416), in clinical trials for the treatment of PONV was infusion site pain (6% vs. 4%).

Use in Specific Populations

Lactation
Amisulpride is present in human milk. There are no reports of adverse effects on the breastfed child and no information on the effects of amisulpride on milk production.

BARHEMSYS may result in an increase in serum prolactin levels, which may lead to a reversible increase in maternal milk production. In a clinical trial, serum prolactin concentrations in females (n=112) increased from a mean of 10 ng/mL at baseline to 32 ng/mL after BARHEMSYS treatment and from 10 ng/mL to 19 ng/mL in males (n=61). No clinical consequences due to elevated prolactin levels were reported.

To minimize exposure to a breastfed infant, lactating women may consider interrupting breastfeeding and pumping and discarding breast milk for 48 hours after receiving a dose of BARHEMSYS.

Pediatric Use
Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients have not been established.

Geriatric Use
No overall differences in safety or effectiveness were observed between these patients and younger patients, and other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients, but greater sensitivity of some older individuals cannot be ruled out.

Renal Impairment
Avoid BARHEMSYS in patients with severe renal impairment (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] < 30 mL/min/1.73 m2). The pharmacokinetics of amisulpride in patients with severe renal impairment have not been adequately studied in clinical trials. Amisulpride is known to be substantially excreted by the kidneys, and patients with severe renal impairment may have increased systemic exposure and an increased risk of adverse reactions.

No dosage adjustment is necessary in patients with mild to moderate renal impairment (eGFR ≥ 30 mL/min/1.73 m2).

Drug Interactions

  • BARHEMSYS causes dose- and concentration-dependent QT prolongation. To avoid potential additive effects, avoid use of BARHEMSYS in patients taking droperidol.
  • ECG monitoring is recommended in patients taking other drugs known to prolong the QT interval (e.g., ondansetron).
  • Reciprocal antagonism of effects occurs between dopamine agonists (e.g., levodopa) and BARHEMSYS. Avoid using levodopa with BARHEMSYS.

Please click to access full Prescribing Information.

BAR HCP ISI 02/2020

Indications

BARHEMSYS is a selective dopamine-2 (D2) and dopamine-3 (D3) receptor antagonist indicated in adults for:

  • prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), either alone or in combination with an antiemetic of a different class
  • treatment of PONV in patients who have received antiemetic prophylaxis with an agent of a different class or have not received prophylaxis

Important Safety Information

Contraindication

BARHEMSYS is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to amisulpride.

QT Prolongation

BARHEMSYS causes dose- and concentration-dependent prolongation of the QT interval. The recommended dosage is 5 mg or 10 mg as a single intravenous (IV) dose infused over 1 to 2 minutes.

Avoid BARHEMSYS in patients with congenital long QT syndrome and in patients taking droperidol.

Electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring is recommended in patients with pre-existing arrhythmias/cardiac conduction disorders, electrolyte abnormalities (e.g., hypokalemia or hypomagnesemia), congestive heart failure, and in patients taking other medicinal products (e.g., ondansetron) or with other medical conditions known to prolong the QT interval.

Adverse Reactions

Common adverse reactions reported in ≥ 2% of adult patients who received BARHEMSYS 5 mg (N=748) and at a higher rate than placebo (N=741) in clinical trials for the prevention of PONV were: chills (4% vs. 3%), hypokalemia (4% vs. 2%), procedural hypotension (3% vs. 2%), and abdominal distention (2% vs. 1%).

Serum prolactin concentrations were measured in one prophylaxis study where 5% (9/176) of BARHEMSYS-treated patients had increased blood prolactin reported as an adverse reaction compared with 1% (1/166) of placebo-treated patients.

The most common adverse reaction, reported in ≥ 2% of adult patients who received BARHEMSYS 10 mg (N=418) and at a higher rate than placebo (N=416), in clinical trials for the treatment of PONV was infusion site pain (6% vs. 4%).

Use in Specific Populations

Lactation
Amisulpride is present in human milk. There are no reports of adverse effects on the breastfed child and no information on the effects of amisulpride on milk production.

BARHEMSYS may result in an increase in serum prolactin levels, which may lead to a reversible increase in maternal milk production. In a clinical trial, serum prolactin concentrations in females (n=112) increased from a mean of 10 ng/mL at baseline to 32 ng/mL after BARHEMSYS treatment and from 10 ng/mL to 19 ng/mL in males (n=61). No clinical consequences due to elevated prolactin levels were reported.

To minimize exposure to a breastfed infant, lactating women may consider interrupting breastfeeding and pumping and discarding breast milk for 48 hours after receiving a dose of BARHEMSYS.

Pediatric Use
Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients have not been established.

Geriatric Use
No overall differences in safety or effectiveness were observed between these patients and younger patients, and other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients, but greater sensitivity of some older individuals cannot be ruled out.

Renal Impairment
Avoid BARHEMSYS in patients with severe renal impairment (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] < 30 mL/min/1.73 m2). The pharmacokinetics of amisulpride in patients with severe renal impairment have not been adequately studied in clinical trials. Amisulpride is known to be substantially excreted by the kidneys, and patients with severe renal impairment may have increased systemic exposure and an increased risk of adverse reactions.

No dosage adjustment is necessary in patients with mild to moderate renal impairment (eGFR ≥ 30 mL/min/1.73 m2).

Drug Interactions

  • BARHEMSYS causes dose- and concentration-dependent QT prolongation. To avoid potential additive effects, avoid use of BARHEMSYS in patients taking droperidol.
  • ECG monitoring is recommended in patients taking other drugs known to prolong the QT interval (e.g., ondansetron).
  • Reciprocal antagonism of effects occurs between dopamine agonists (e.g., levodopa) and BARHEMSYS. Avoid using levodopa with BARHEMSYS.

Please click to access full Prescribing Information.

BAR HCP ISI 02/2020

5-HT3=serotonin. CI=confidence interval. IV=intravenous. PONV=postoperative nausea and vomiting. SD=standard deviation.

References: 1. BARHEMSYS [Prescribing Information], Indianapolis, IN. Acacia Pharma; 2020. 2. Habib AS, Kranke P, Bergese SD, et al. Amisulpride for the rescue treatment of postoperative nausea or vomiting in patients failing prophylaxis: a randomized, placebo-controlled phase III trial. Anesthesiology. 2019;130(2):203-212. 3. Kranke P, Bergese SD, Minkowitz HS, et al. Amisulpride prevents postoperative nausea and vomiting in patients at high risk: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Anesthesiology. 2018;128(6):1099-110. 4. Gan TJ, Belani KG, Bergese S, et al. Fourth Consensus Guidelines for the Management of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting. Anesth Analg. 2020;131(2):411-448. 5. Gan TJ, Kranke P, Minkowitz HS, et al. Intravenous amisulpride for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting: two concurrent, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. Anesthesiology. 2017;126(2):268-2756. 6. Candiotti KA, Kranke P, Bergese SD, et al. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of intravenous amisulpride as treatment of established postoperative nausea and vomiting in patients who have had no prior prophylaxis. Anesth Analg. 2019;128(6):1098-1105.